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Colegio El Roble en Interlomas Estado de México.

Get ready

to

learn

Recurso 2

Get ready

to

learn

Recurso 2
No matter who you are, regardless of any  describing factor you could think of, you have faced learning-moments that have gotten you to this point in life. Now, how could we deepen and strengthen the relationship we have to learning in general?

Maybe if we could better understand the concept of learning we could enjoy the process more.

No matter who you are, regardless of any  describing factor you could think of, you have faced learning-moments that have gotten you to this point in life. Now, how could we deepen and strengthen the relationship we have to learning in general?

Maybe if we could better understand the concept of learning we could enjoy the process more.

Notes on learning:

a) Learning is  synonymous width change, betterment, progress and growth.

b) Learning is observable in many ways: conduct, performance and skill.

c) Learning and failing are one in the same. Mistakes are always opportunities to learn.

d) Learning is not static, which is good news because you can always deepen and expand your learnings.

Notes on learning:

a) Learning is  synonymous width change, betterment, progress and growth.

b) Learning is observable in many ways: conduct, performance and skill.

c) Learning and failing are one in the same. Mistakes are always opportunities to learn.

d) Learning is not static, which is good news because you can always deepen and expand your learnings.

Tips to prepare you to learn:

Tips to prepare you to learn:

Recognize and declare that you aren’t an expert and express your desire to know more

It may seem absurd but many times we ourselves represent the first hurdle to achieving a learning mindset.

Which is why it’s so important to ask yourself in the most loving way “what do I know and what don’t I know”, then your will to learn will be less defensive.

There’s no shame, rather much liberation in admitting your lack of knowledge in times of learning.

Be curious and ask questions

Arrogance is the first blockade to a healthy learning experience.
Use your bravery to ask questions and although it might feel unsteady, let others see your vulnerability.
Curiosity can be a great guide here, freeing you up to get closer, use your touch, comprehend how things work, ask questions, play with the
concepts at hand and try different approaches.

Remember: you can always learn from others, that’s why we have community, friendships, and families. Trust yourself and your toolset. 

Practice, Practice, Practice

Every single skill or learned attribute requires repetition. It may sound tedious but it’s true.

Practice leads to a deeper and stronger implementation of ideas and skills.
With each repetition you will see improvements and micro learnings throughout the process.
This is another way of tracking your progress.

Above all, learning is more about the mindset than the skill that is looking to be adopted.
If learning is something that will accompany us through life, why not enjoy it?

Ask yourself:
am I in an TFT
(terrible first time)

Life is full of TFT’s and will always find ways to place us in vulnerable first times.
This could range from driving an acquaintance to the airport or giving a speech to a crowded auditorium for the first time. Normally, we can feel anxious and paralyzed because we feel ashamed that we lack know-how or for fear of making a mistake.

Other reasons include guilt of not knowing how something is done or masking it with cockiness, wanting to seem more in control than you are.

The first step to finding your footing is to recognize your TFT. Name it. First time doing what? Relax and try to enter a learning mindset where it isn’t necessary to defend anything about yourself, rather time to learn.
Find a mentor or a friend to help and enjoy the process.

Listen actively and closely

When learning it is best to listen more than you speak; and when you do it’s best to open your mind and ask questions to gather even more information.

By listening we can avoid jumping to conclusions and slow the rhythm of our knee-jerk reactions.
Try to listen for new words that you may not understand to widen your vocabulary. Look for subtle differences between the elements at hand. Observation is like listening through your eyes and it leads
to connection of ideas, concepts and answers.

By practicing observation and listening overstating and assuming, you will soon begin to see things clearer.
Listen to your inner dialogue throughout the process and if you notice it is being negative, unkind and distracting, try your best to silence it and focus your attention on the task at hand.
A humble state of mind tends to lead to learning and opens up the brain to receive feedback and keep growing.

Are you ready to get out of your own way
and start learning?

Ricardo Jiménez Lara

Recognize and declare that you aren’t an expert and express your desire to know more

It may seem absurd but many times we ourselves represent the first hurdle to achieving a learning mindset.

Which is why it’s so important to ask yourself in the most loving way “what do I know and what don’t I know”, then your will to learn will be less defensive.

There’s no shame, rather much liberation in admitting your lack of knowledge in times of learning.

Be curious and ask questions

Arrogance is the first blockade to a healthy learning experience.
Use your bravery to ask questions and although it might feel unsteady, let others see your vulnerability.
Curiosity can be a great guide here, freeing you up to get closer, use your touch, comprehend how things work, ask questions, play with the
concepts at hand and try different approaches.

Remember: you can always learn from others, that’s why we have community, friendships, and families. Trust yourself and your toolset. 

Recognize and declare that you aren’t an expert and express your desire to know more

It may seem absurd but many times we ourselves represent the first hurdle to achieving a learning mindset.

Which is why it’s so important to ask yourself in the most loving way “what do I know and what don’t I know”, then your will to learn will be less defensive.

There’s no shame, rather much liberation in admitting your lack of knowledge in times of learning.

Ask yourself:
am I in an TFT
(terrible first time)

Life is full of TFT’s and will always find ways to place us in vulnerable first times.
This could range from driving an acquaintance to the airport or giving a speech to a crowded auditorium for the first time. Normally, we can feel anxious and paralyzed because we feel ashamed that we lack know-how or for fear of making a mistake.

Other reasons include guilt of not knowing how something is done or masking it with cockiness, wanting to seem more in control than you are.

The first step to finding your footing is to recognize your TFT. Name it. First time doing what? Relax and try to enter a learning mindset where it isn’t necessary to defend anything about yourself, rather time to learn.
Find a mentor or a friend to help and enjoy the process.

Listen actively and closely

When learning it is best to listen more than you speak; and when you do it’s best to open your mind and ask questions to gather even more information.

By listening we can avoid jumping to conclusions and slow the rhythm of our knee-jerk reactions.
Try to listen for new words that you may not understand to widen your vocabulary. Look for subtle differences between the elements at hand. Observation is like listening through your eyes and it leads
to connection of ideas, concepts and answers.

By practicing observation and listening overstating and assuming, you will soon begin to see things clearer.
Listen to your inner dialogue throughout the process and if you notice it is being negative, unkind and distracting, try your best to silence it and focus your attention on the task at hand.
A humble state of mind tends to lead to learning and opens up the brain to receive feedback and keep growing.

Are you ready to get out of your own way
and start learning?

Ricardo Jiménez Lara

#SomosRoble

#SomosRoble

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